Generator Operational Parameters Frequently Asked Questions

The SMD commitment software does not automatically recognize start-up and shutdown profiles. Instead, the software considers a generator available for dispatch at or above EcoMin from the first hour scheduled online to the last hour scheduled online. To ensure that generators are committed in accordance with the physical constraints inherent in their design, the generator owners must adjust the generator parameters to recognize start-up and shutdown profiles.

A resource can clear in the Day-Ahead Market economically in the first hour of operation at amounts up to the greater of the Manual Response Rate multiplied by 60 or the EcoMin. Initially, the first hour of operation in the Day-Ahead Market clearing is converted into a start-time and the last hour into a shut down time. These times do not include any start-up or shut down profiles. Upon the close of the Day-Ahead Market, the Lead Market Participant or Designated Entity must review schedules for their resources and submit any start-up or shutdown profiles to the Forecaster. The Forecaster will consider these values along with the cleared Day-Ahead Market schedules and commit additional resources as required to meet capacity needs. If a generator is committed as a result of the Resource Adequacy Assessment (RAA) process, the Forecaster will contact the Lead Market Participant or Designated Entity to advise them of the intended commitment and request them to submit start-up and shutdown profiles for that resource. These values will be incorporated in the RAA commitment to ensure the software can consider all of the generator outputs in the solution.

The definitions for specific generator parameters used for commitment purposes are as follows:

Notification Time -The minimum time required from the time an order is received from ISO to come online to the time when the generator synchronizes to the system. Three different Notification Times (Hot, Intermediate, and Cold) can be submitted to allow the Participant to reflect the difference in the length of time for each condition.

Start Up Time -The total time required from the time the generator synchronizes to the system to the time the generator is released for dispatch to the ISO. Three different Start-Up Times (Hot, Intermediate, and Cold) can be submitted to allow the Participant to reflect the difference in the length of time for each condition.

Start Up Profile -This hourly profile describes the MWH of output expected during each of the hours in the Start-Up Time. When a resource is committed in the Day-Ahead Market or during the Resource Adequacy Assessment (RAA), the generator owner is required to submit the MWH expected for each of the hours from the time the generator synchronizes to the system to the time the generator is scheduled to be released for dispatch to the ISO. The number of hourly MWH values submitted should match the hours described in the applicable Hot, Intermediate, or Cold Start Time. If Start Time is thirty minutes or less, no Start-Up Profile should be submitted.

Shut Down Profile -This hourly profile describes the MWH of output that normally occurs in each hour from the time a generator is released for shut down from EcoMin by the ISO to the time the generator de-synchronizes from the system. If the resource can de-synchronize from EcoMin in less than thirty minutes, no Shut Down Profile should be submitted.

Hot to Cold Time -The time from de-synchronization that cold condition apply.

Hot to Inter Time -The time from de-synchronization that intermediate conditions apply.

Minimum Run Time -The minimum number of hours of operation at or above EcoMin that the generator owner requires the ISO recognize when committing the resource. The Minimum Run Time applies from the point where the generator is scheduled to be released for dispatch to the ISO from EcoMin to the point where the ISO releases the generator for shut down from EcoMin. Generator Owners should exclude the Start Up Profile hours (Start Up Time) and Shut Down Profile hours from the Minimum Run Time to ensure the software recognizes the constraints described by all of the generator parameters on cycling the resource in the commitment process. Resources clearing in the Day-Ahead Market will have schedules for consecutive hours that are equal to or greater than the Minimum Run Time.

Minimum Down Time -The minimum number of hours that the generator owner requires between the time the generator is released for shutdown by the ISO and the time the generator is scheduled to be released for dispatch to the ISO. Generator Owners should include the Shut Down Profile hours and the Start Up Profile (Start Time) hours in the Minimum Down Time to ensure the software recognizes the constraints described by all of the generator parameters on cycling the resource in the commitment process. Resources clearing in the Day-Ahead Market will have schedules that do not violate the Minimum Down Time.

No Load Cost -The cost associated with generation resource that is an online, but not supplying energy to the system. A better way to describe No Load would be to think of it as the amount, in dollars per hour, that participants with an ownership share in a generating unit scheduled in the New England wholesale energy market must be paid. The No Load cost amount is an additional payment to the start-up fee and price offered to supply electric energy for each hour.

Reference: WEM 101 training material.

The basic technical requirements can be found in : Operating Procedure 14. Generators must meet the eligibility requirements of Market Rule 1 and ISO Manuals to become active in the ISO markets.

VAR Test - to participate in VAR compensation program .
Black Start Test - to request a Black Start Capability Test review System Operating Procedure SOP-RTMKTS.0190.0080 [PDF].
Claimed Capability Audits - to establish the Seasonal Claimed Capability (both Winter and Summer) of a generator. Reference ISO New England manual M-20 ICAP, Attachment D Section: Claimed Capability Audits and System Operating Procedure-Conduct Capability Audit SOP-RTMKTS.0180.0040.

Claimed Capability Audits (CCA) are conducted to establish the winter and summer Seasonal Claimed Capability (SCC) values of a Generator Asset and to comply with NPCC Regional Reliability Reference Directory # 9 Verification of Generation Gross and Net Real Power Capability.

Section III.1.5.1 Claimed Capability Audits of Market Rule 1 and Operating Procedure 23 are the two principal governing documents. On September 1, 2013, the Claimed Capability Audit Tool (CCAT) on the SMD Applications homepage became the sole means of requesting, submitting, and reviewing CCAs.

To coordinate demonstrations with the ISO New England Control Room, consult the ISO’s System Operating Procedures.

Submissions and requests for all audit types should be entered in the Claimed Capability Audit Tool (CCAT) through the SMD Applications homepage. To access CCAT, the user must:

  • Be registered in ISO New England's Customer Asset Management System (CAMS) as a Lead Market Participant for the Generator Asset
  • Have an active digital certificate
  • Have access to the application granted to them by their Security Administrator

View additional CCA training materials.

The essentials for scheduling of any testing or maintenance activity is to ensure that approval is obtained through the NEPOOL Operating Procedure 5 protocols and that the data submitted into the Market for the resource supports the activity.

Generator owners are required to schedule any testing or maintenance activity that can impact normal operation or expected availability of their resource(s). NEPOOL Operating Procedure 5 describes in detail the rules and requirements for the scheduling of generator tests, reductions or outages.

Generator owners are also responsible for submitting bids and offers that reflect or support the testing or maintenance activity being performed. For example, if an owner has scheduled a test that requires that the generator operate at half load from 10:00 to 12:00, then the generator must submit the following:

A self-schedule with an EcoMin value set to half load for hours ending 11 and 12. A self-schedule ensures that the generator will not be dispatched economically below the half load level or EcoMin ensuring that the test can be performed. When self-scheduling, the generator must recognize the generator parameters, such as minimum runtime, that were submitted to ISO-NE.

An EcoMax value set to half load for hours ending 11 and 12. This ensures the unit will not be dispatched economically above the half load level or EcoMax ensuring that the test can be performed. It also ensures that ISO-NE does not rely on reserve capability above the half load level during the testing activity.

The System Operating Procedure SOP-RTMKTS.0110.0010 Maintain Real-Time Operational Data [PDF]. Section 5.4.3 Redeclarations for Commitment/DE-Commitment states 30 minute notice is required so the ISO can evaluate the system conditions and determine if the commitment/de-commitment can be accommodated.

FI_UNITOPER reports are not generated for units that have been designated as Fast Start resources.

These parameters are important for the following reasons:
System Operation Impact

  • The Information is used by ISO New England's control room providing the MW amount that can be counted upon in the system dispatch to be available from an off-line state within 10-minutes or 30-minutes of a Dispatch Instruction;

Market Operations Impact

  • Eligibility for Reserve Shortage Opportunity Cost for off-line Resources requires a CLAIM10 or CLAIM30 value greater than zero.
  • The Forward Reserve Market uses CLAIM10 and CLAIM30 to measure the Delivered Forward Reserve of Off-Line Forward Reserve Resources. A zero value represents an inability to satisfy NERC and NPCC criteria for providing either 10-minute or 30-minute non-synchronous Operating Reserve from an off-line state (see Sections 3.3.5, 3.3.7.1, and examples in Section 3.3.7.4). Therefore, a zero value of CLAIM10 and CLAIM30 will result in non-payment and potential penalties in the Forward Reserve Market.

ISO New England strongly suggests Participant Generation owners review CLAIM10 and CLAIM30 Offer Data Parameters of your generating units. The current values can be seen in the Unit Manger screen in eMarket Parameters listed with zero values caused by an audit failure, can only be changed by the Designated Entity (DE). This request is initiated via a call from the Designated Entity (DE) to ISO New England's Control Room.

Otherwise the change process can be initiated by an e-mail to ISO New England's Customer Service Department at custserv@iso-ne.com or a telephone call from the Lead Market Participant or Designated Entity (DE) to ISO New England's Customer Service Department (413-540-4220). The Lead Market Participant and/or Designated Entity (DE) are responsible for the accuracy of these parameters as well as any Market Settlement impacts that occur due to these values.

These parameters are subject to audit and Redeclaration (by the ISO or by the Designated Entity) under Manual 11. In addition, Manual 11 provides, in cases where no amount was submitted, for a default value of zero.

The Definition of CLAIM10 and CLAIM30 are in ISO New England Manual 35. The generation output level, expressed in MW, which can be reached by a Generator (from an off-line state) within ten minutes (CLAIM10) and thirty minutes (CLAIM30) after receiving a Dispatch Instruction from the ISO. This value is required as part of the Generator's Offer Data and will be used by the ISO to evaluate the Generator in meeting NEPOOL's Operating and Replacement Reserve Requirements.

Generators greater than 5 MWS - complete and submit an I.3.9 application found in Proposed Plans 5-1 requesting retirement of the generator: ISO NE Proposed Plan Application Forms.

That form will be reviewed by both ISO and the Reliability Committee to see if the retirement would cause a reliability problem for the grid. If so, the retirement will be denied. If it is determined that there is no reliability impact as a result of the generator retirement, the request will be approved. The customer then submits a Generator Asset Registration form stating the formally approved retirement date and requesting that the generator be retired from the markets. That submission will then start the internal ISO process to remove the unit from all ISO databases for the requested effective date.

Generators less than 5 MWs - complete and submit a Generator Notification Form for units less than 5 MWs. That form will be reviewed by ISO and the Reliability Committee. In most circumstances, this is an informational filing and the unit can request retirement at any time after the filing. The customer then submits a Settlement Only Generator Asset Registration form requesting that the unit be retired. That submission will then start the internal ISO process to remove the unit from all ISO databases for the requested effective date.

Regarding clarification of DDP tolerance:

Market Rule 1 III.3.2.3 (f)
A generator is considered to be following a dispatch instruction if the actual output of the generator is not greater than 10% above its desired dispatch point and is not less than 10% below its desired dispatch point for each interval in the hour.

Generators with an Economic Max less than or equal to 50 MWs are considered to be following a dispatch instruction if the actual output of the generator is not greater than 5 MWs above its desired dispatch point and is not less than 5 MWs below its desired dispatch point for each interval in the hour. If the generator violates this criterion in any interval during the hour, the generator is considered to be not following dispatch instructions for the entire hour.

With regard to how qualifying MW's are calculated for the Locational Forward Reserve market, these are calculated using real-time offer parameters, as noted in Market Rule 1, section III.9.6.4:

"On-line qualifying megawatts: is the capability that is less than or equal to the Economic Maximum Limit and above the Economic Minimum Limit that is offered at or above the applicable Forward Reserve Threshold Price by an on-line generating Resource..."

Here's an example of this calculation:
Qualifying MW Upper Limit (Ecomax) - Qualifying MW Lower Limit (Ecomin)

Forward Reserve Obligation: 15 mw. Eco Max 47(Bid Parameter) - Eco Min 37(Bid Parameter) = 10.0 Qualifying MW. This results in a failure to reserve penalty of 5 mw.

There are a few requirements that must be met to qualify as a Non-Dispatchable Asset Related Demand asset. Follow the [PDF] and complete the Asset Related Demand Registration Form[XLS].Section 12.3.5.3 of Manual 28 details the following requirements:Registration Process Flow

  • An individual end-use metered customer or firm that purchases products for its own consumption and not for resale (i.e. an ultimate customer)
  • An end-use customer peak load of 5 MW or greater during the 12 months preceding enrollment. New end-use customer loads without 12 months of history will be evaluated by the Host Participant Assigned Meter Reader to determine if the anticipated load will meet the 5 MW threshold
  • Aggregation of end-use customer loads, in order to meet the 5 MW threshold, will not be allowed
  • Metering and Telemetering Criteria specified in Operating Procedure 18.
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